Ten interesting tidbits about Ethio-Armenia

Ten interesting tidbits about Ethio-Armenia
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(Previous post missed left out 4 of the 10)
Checkout the Tezeta campaign by Aramazt Kalayjian. A project in the process of making a documenting film about the Ethiopians Armenian. This
has always been my favorite of Ethiopian subcultures.

— According to Roman historian Dio Cassius, in 66 A.D. Roman Emperor Nero had “Ethiopian women, men, and children fight” at a munus to impress King Tiridates I of Armenia. Widely hated by his populace, Nero’s reign would come to a destructive end two years later. Nero choosing.suicide than face a mob justice.

— It is widely known hypothesis that the Armenian alphabet traces its origin to Ethiopia. The University of California Los Angelos carries a large collection of Armenian and Ethiopic manuscripts and its scholars suspect the similarities can be traced to Armenian Saint Mesrob Mashtots. Saint Mesrob was seeking to create a distinct Armenian alphabet, and may have encountered the Ethiopic fidel alphabet (fidel) while in Jerusalem in the fourth century.

— One of the earliest recorded Armenians to visit Ethiopia was geographer Abu Salih (1364-1442), who explored Ethiopia in the fourtheen century and wrote about Ethiopia\’s possession of the Ark of the Covenant in his classic “Churches and Monasteries of Egypt and some Neighbouring Countries”.

— During the 16th century, Ethiopia choose Armenian diplomats such as Matteos the Armenian to seekout Portuguese support to combat the threatening army of Ahmed Gragn. This officially began Ethiopia’s unique relationship with Armenia.

— According to an interview with Ethio-Armenian Vartkes Nalbandian by the Ethiopian Reporter, entited: ““We’re still here” – Armenians in Ethiopia.” Nalbandian said that when a “decree proclaimed the banishment of all foreigners from Ethiopia in 1902”, Armenians were exempt. Nalbandian reasons this to that Ethio-Armenia relationship since the 1600s—-so selective it resulted in European travelers having to disguise themselves “in Armenian custome” to enter Ethiopia.

— Sarkis Terzian was among those many Armenian-entrepreneurs that settled in the 19th century in Ethiopia, arriving in Harar in 1868. Terzian became successfull in arms importer and became a close business cliente to Emperor.Monelik–arms that rebelled the Italians in the Battle of Adwa. Terzian is credited for importing the first stream roller into Ethiopia in 1904 which began an age of road development.

— Considered the most famous of Ethiopian Armenian architects, Minas Kherbekian came to ethiopia in 1881 and contributed greatly in overseeing the construction of bridges, churches, and other buildings between Diwa Dawa and Addis Ababa, introducing traditional armenian architectural styles. Some of the most notable is the Mohammed Ali House (1920) and the Etegue Hote l(1907) often regarded as the Taitu Hotel; which still stands today.

— Ethiopian Armenian Stephan Papazian contributed in designing the 1930 Coronation stamps.

— Considered the pioneer of modern African art is Al`exander “Skunder” Boghossian (1937-2003). Skunder was the cild of an ethiopian mother and an Armenian father that served as member of the Imperial Guard and was a resistance fighter during Italian occupation.

— One of Ethiopia’s most recent Armenian newcomer didn’t exactly come on his own accord. Armenian-born political nationalist and Soviet dissident Paruir Airikyan was in 1988 stripped of his citizenship and “transported by force” to Addis Ababa. . Airikyan was welcomed with enthusaism by the local Ethiopian Armenian community. Airikyan later received political asylum in the United States and later following the collapse of the Soviet Union had his citizenship reinstated.

— Armenian Stephan Papazian contributed in designing the 1930 Coronation stamps.

— Considered the pioneer of modern African art is Al`exander “Skunder” Boghossian (1937-2003). Skunder was the cild of an ethiopian mother and a father that , served as member of the Imperial Guard and resistance fighter during Italian occupation.

— One of Ethiopia’s most recent Armenian newcomer didn’t exactly come on his own accord. Armenian-born political nationalist and Soviet dissident Paruir Airikyan was in 1988 stripped of his citizenship and “transported by force” to Addis Ababa. Airikyan. Airikyan was welcomed with enthusaism by the local Ethiopian Armenian community. Airikyan later received political asylum in the United States embassy later have his citizenship reinstated.

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2 Responses to Ten interesting tidbits about Ethio-Armenia

  1. yes says:

    Armenian Ethiopian friendship should live forever, but Armenian alphabet is not influenced by Ethiopian… It is the other way around!

  2. Pingback: 3 Fun Facts About the Armenian Alphabet – Pack Your Mat

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